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Letters to Jessica

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Letters to Jessica

Postby PHOSPHENE » Sat Feb 26, 2011 5:52 pm

http://www.bornagainclassics.com/letter ... ssica.html

Letter One

February 1st, 1987

Dear Jessica;

It was very nice to stay with you over the holidays. I especially enjoyed tickle-time, playing monkeys always look and all those computer games with you, Halley and Rachael! I am very pleased to have such fine nieces.

I am writing this letter to you, Jessica, because you are the oldest and you are in the first grade already. But I'm writing to your sisters as well. When they are older I hope you'll share this letter with them.

What I have to tell you is very important. I want to tell you some things I have learned. Things that someone should have told me when I was your age. Grown-ups are playing a very bad game of make believe. I played, too, for many years. Grown-ups tricked me when I was in the first grade like you. They made me think their game was real life. But now I know it's all pretend. I have stopped playing. I hope that if I tell you about the game you may never be tricked into playing like I was. Here is one thing I didn't know when I was in first grade like you. Grown-ups like to play make-believe just as much as children. Only they do not admit they are playing a game.

Do you remember The Wizard of Oz? Dorothy and her little dog Toto are carried by a tornado to the Land of Oz. There they meet the Scarecrow, the Tin Woodman, and the Cowardly Lion.

They heard about the Wizard of Oz and went to see him. The story tells what they learn about the Wizard. It is a fairy tale for children. It is a very good story. But the man who wrote it, L. Frank Baum, wanted to tell something about grown-ups, too. All fairy tales are like that. They tell us something about real people living in the real world.

You remember, Dorothy melted the Wicked Witch with a bucket of water. Then she and her friends returned to the Emerald City to claim the promises given them by the Wizard. After waiting many days they were let into the throne room.

But the Wizard was not there. It was so quiet and still that they were somewhat frightened. Then, as the story goes...

Presently they heard a solemn Voice, that seemed to come from somewhere near the top of the great dome.
"I am Oz, the Great and Terrible. Why do you seek me?"
They looked again in every part of the room, and then, seeing no one, Dorothy asked, "Where are you?"
"I am everywhere," answered the Voice, "but to the eyes of common mortals I am invisible. I will now seat myself upon my throne that you may converse with me."

(...Dorothy and her friends asked Oz for what he had promised them as a reward for destroying the Wicked Witch. Oz wanted them to wait so he could think it over. But, as the story continues...)

The Lion thought it might be as well to frighten the Wizard, so he gave a large, loud roar, which was so fierce and dreadful that Toto jumped away from him in alarm and tipped over the screen that stood in a corner. As it fell with a crash they looked that way, and the next moment all of them were filled with wonder. For they saw, standing in just the spot the screen had hidden, a little old man, with a bald head and a wrinkled face, who seemed to be as much surprised as they were. The Tin Woodsman, raising his ax, rushed toward the little man and cried out, "Who are you?"
I am Oz, the Great and Terrible," said the little man, in a trembling voice. "But don't strike me-please don't-and I'll do anything you want me to."
Our friends looked at him in surprise and dismay.
"I thought Oz was a great Head," said Dorothy.
"And I thought Oz was a lovely Lady," said the Scarecrow.
"And I thought Oz was a terrible Beast," said the Tin Woodman.
"And I thought Oz was a Ball of Fire," exclaimed the Lion.
"No, you are all wrong, said the little man meekly. "I have been making believe."
"Making believe!" cried Dorothy. "Are you not a Great Wizard?"
"Hush, my dear," he said. "Don't speak so loud, or you will be overheard-and I should be ruined. I'm supposed to be a Great Wizard."
"And aren't you?" she asked.
"Not a bit of it, my dear. I'm just a common man."
"You're more than that," said the Scarecrow, in a grieved tone. "You're a humbug."
"Exactly so!" declared the little man, rubbing his hands together as if it pleased him. "I am a humbug."

(...The Wizard of Oz was a humbug. A humbug is some-one who tricks others by pretending to be something he isn't. He tricked all the people of Oz into believing he was something terrible. In that way he ruled over them. The story goes on as Oz says...)

"Just to amuse myself, and keep the good people busy, I ordered them to build this City, and my Palace; and they did it all willingly and well. Then I thought, as the country was so green and beautiful, I would call it the Emerald City. And to make the name fit better I put green spectacles on all the people, so that everything they saw was green."
"But isn't everything here green?" asked Dorothy.
"No more than in any other city," replied Oz. "But when you wear green spectacles, why of course everything you see looks green to you. The Emerald City was built a great many years ago, for I was a young man when the balloon brought me here, and I am a very old man now. But my people have worn green glasses on their eyes so long that most of them think it really is an Emerald City, and it certainly is a beautiful place, abounding in jewels and precious metals, and every good thing that is needed to make one happy."

Now, Jessica, the man who wrote The Wizard of Oz wanted to tell children who read his book about the game of make-believe that grown-ups are playing. It seems so real most grown-ups don't even know it is a game of pretend. If you try to tell them about it they won't even listen because they have been playing too long and too hard to quit. But first graders have not really started to play yet, so they can see it's all pretend.

When I was in first grade my teacher taught me the game but didn't tell me it was only make-believe. I was over thirty-five years old before I found out about the terrible game all grown-ups are playing. I want to tell you about it so they can't trick you.

Grown-ups like the game so much they want all their children to play, too. Children like you are sent to school to learn to read and write and do arithmatic. Even so, many children never learn to read and write. Your Uncle Craig was one of them. He had to teach himself how to read and write when he was out of school. One thing grown-ups make certain to teach all children is how to play the game when they grow up.

Here is how the game goes. We are living in a very fine country just like the land of Oz. The land we live in is green and beautiful. It abounds in jewels and precious metals, and every good thing that is needed to make one happy, just like the Emerald City. The name of our country is America. The part of our country where you live is called Alaska. The part where I am living is called Idaho. Just like Oz, there are many good people living here.

The people of Oz were tricked into believing that there was a wizard that ruled over them. The people of America have been tricked into believing the same thing. In America there are fifty Great Wizards! One of them you have already heard of; it is called the State of Alaska. Another is the State of Idaho. A state is a kind of wizard. Over all these Great Wizards is one Supreme Wizard called the United States which is imagined to rule over all of America. Just like the Wizard of Oz, sometimes the Wizards of America appear to be great Heads when they tell the people of America what to do. At other times these wizards appear to be lovely ladies as they do helpful things for the people they rule. Sometimes they seem to be terrible beasts and balls of fire when they do mean things and hurt people. Before they can do a nice thing they must first do a mean thing to someone. The Wizard of Oz never hurt his people like the Wizards of America. The Wizards of America sometimes turn into wicked witches. That is why the game is bad.

Since these wizards are only make-believe they are always invisible and can live forever. Some people believe so hard in the State of Alaska they think it is real just like mountains and rivers. They will tell you it is wrong to think the State is a pretend Wizard. Ask them to show you the State. They can not show you because it is invisible, it is only in their imagination, just like Santa Claus and the Tooth Fairy.

Children like to play make-believe. It is lots of fun. When children grow up they still like to play make-believe. But they forget their games are only pretend. Then it isn't fun any more. They play so hard they hurt one another. Grown-ups need someone to tell them to stop playing before more people get hurt. Even a child could tell them.

In my next letter I'll tell you how Wizards of America is played. Say hello to your Mom and Dad and your sisters. Bye for now!
“Anarchism is not a romantic fable but the hardheaded realization, based on five thousand years of experience, that we cannot entrust the management of our lives to kings, priests, politicians, generals, and county commissioners.” ―Edward Abbey

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Re: Letters to Jessica

Postby PHOSPHENE » Sat Feb 26, 2011 5:53 pm

Letter Two

February 2nd, 1987 Dear Jessica,

Here is how grown-ups play the terrible game of Wizards of America. I hope you decide not to play. There are grown-ups who pretend to speak with the voice of Wizards of America. They speak in a solemn voice just like Oz and the people are afraid and tremble. But just like Oz these grown-ups are only little, common men hiding behind screens. Just like Oz they are humbugs.

To see why grown-ups like this game of wizards so much and how much fun it is, pretend that you woke up one morning and everyone was tricked into believing that you are the Wizard of Alaska. You sisters, your friends, your Mom and Dad, your teacher and the neighbors would have to do just what you told them to do. It would be a lot like playing Simon Says. Doesn't that sound like fun?

Of course as in many pretend games there are certain magic words that must be used. In the game Simon Says, the magic words are Simon Says: Simon says take two steps forward. In the game of pretend grown-ups are playing you must speak in a solemn voice like all wizards and tell people it's really the State of Alaska speaking: The State says take two steps forward. It's sort of like using a handpuppet. Never say Wizard of Alaska because that will give the game away and many will stop playing. You must say the magic words, The State says.

You might use your wizard voice and say, The State says there will be year round summer vacation! You must call this a law. That's another important magic word. Grown-ups are fond of saying It's the law. Right or wrong doesn't matter.

You would have to be very careful because grown-ups take this game very seriously and sometimes they hurt one another while they play. It is the most important thing in their life. More important than good and right and justice is to them.

You might want to do something very nice for all your friends. You might say, No one will make anything but milk and cookies to eat. That sounds like fun, doesn't it! But remember everyone thinks you're the Wizard of Alaska. If Grandma Mary invites you to dinner and decides to make some of her delicious stew and biscuits with cake and ice cream for dessert, the police might come and stop her and maybe put her in jail. The police would know it isn't right to put a grandmother in jail for making a good dinner. But they would rather play the game than do what is right. It's the law, you know, and the State says. By trying to do something nice for your friends you do something bad to Grandma Mary. This is only one reason why playing wizards is a terrible game.

Of course it's only grown-ups that get to be Wizard of Alaska or Wizard of America. They take turns being wizard. First one tries it, then another. But no matter which common man is playing the wizard everyone else pretends he is great and terrible. Everyone knows he is a only a common man and a humbug, but they don't say a thing because that would ruin the game! Most grown-ups would be very unhappy to see the game end. They wouldn't have any idea what to think or do.

When grown-ups speak and act for the state they are called many strange wizard names. Some are called senators or congressmen. Some are called governors or Presidents. Some are called lawyers or judges. Some are called policemen. Each of these men or women pretend to be powerful wizards who speak and act for the great invisible wizards. These people don't mean to do bad things. They try to do good things. But even their good things always turn out to be bad for somebody. And they never stop believing in wizards. That is not good because wizards are not real, they are only pretend. Grown-ups should know better. They should live in the real world, but they don't.

There are many, many other parts to play in the game. The lowest players are called citizens. The very lowest citizens are called first graders. Your Mom and Dad may be citizens. You can ask them. Part of the game is to pretend that citizens have all the power, but to act like wizards really have all the power. That way responsibiltiy for what humbugs do is shared by all grown-ups. Wizards' power is only pretend, but if someone makes believe hard enough then their power seems very real. Children who learn the rules and play the game very well can hope to be a wizard someday themselves. I was once the kind of wizard called an officer. I was a captain. When I was sent to first grade they began to teach me the rules for the game of Wizards of America. One of the very first rules is that everyone must pledge allegiance to the flag and to the republic. You may already have been taught to say this pledge:

"I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

Everyone knows that first graders have no idea what pledging allegiance means. They want you to do it first, then many years later you will find out what it means. But I'll tell you now so you can decide if you really want to or not.

Pledging allegiance means that you will do whatever any wizard tells you to do, even after you grow up yourself. Pledge means the same as promise. Allegiance means having to do what you are told. Like obeying your parents. So pledging allegiance is a promise to obey some humbug who you have never met no matter what dumb thing he tells you to do.

Allegiance is pledged to the flag because it is the symbol for the whole game. Just like a picture of an apple pie is a symbol for a real apple pie. The picture of the pie makes you think of how a pie looks, tastes and smells. The flag makes you think of how the game is played, what your part is in the game, and all the powerful wizards of the past, like George Washington. You probably have already heard of Washington. He helped invent the game of United States many years ago. He was one of the most powerful wizards and one of the best players ever.

The flag stands for the republic. Republic is another word for the United States, the biggest Wizard in America. George Washington and the other men who started the game did not pledge allegiance to the wizards because they made them up and knew they were only pretend. They had not been tricked. They all pledged allegiance to God. They promised to obey God's laws rather than the wizards. The game was not nearly so bad then.

You and I were tricked into pledging allegiance to humbugs because grown-ups know they must have new players all the time or else the game will stop. If the game stops all the wizards will have to go back to being common men, just like the Wizard of Oz did. Then, if they tell others what to do, people will just laugh!

To make the game more interesting the Wizards of America have tricked all the people into believing that there is a wicked Witch of the east and a wicked Witch of the West. This scares all the citizens and makes them believe even harder in the power of their wizards.

The wicked Witch of the East is called Russia. The wicked Witch of the West is called China. Part of the trick is that the wizards want these witches to be feared, but they still help them as much as they can to be big and strong. That's different from Oz who wanted the wicked witches to be destroyed so the people would be safe.

Both Russia and China are green and beautiful countries just like America, with all the good things needed to be happy. They each have their own games of Wizard going. Their's is played almost exactly like ours. They think America is the wicked witch. Sometimes America is a wicked witch.

To play Wizards of America you must have glasses like the ones Oz gave to all his people. But they don't make everything look green like in the Emerald City. These glasses make everything in America seem to be very nice and good, with liberty and justice for all, like in the pledge of allegiance. Making people say the pledge over and over again when they ar e children helps them to pretend everything is just fine when it isn't. The pledge of Allegiance is the first big trick grown-ups play on children.

Liberty means that as long as you don't hurt anyone, no one can tell you what to do. Justice means that if you do hurt someone you must make it right. You may even be punished. Liberty and justice means that as long as you're doing good and not evil, no one can tell you what to do, not even humbugs.

Of course you can't play Wizards of America and have liberty and justice, too. Wizards wouldn't be wizards if citizens didn't do as they were told. So part of the trick is to make everything look like liberty and justice in America when it really is the same as all the other countries, like Russia and China.

Well, now you know some of the tricks grown-ups play on children and why they do it. Humbugs of America and humbugs of Russia and humbugs of all the other countries don't ever want to stop playing. For wizards it is a very exciting and fun game. And they get lots of money, too. But it is a very dangerous game and many people are hurt. Many are even killed. Many of my friends were hurt and killed when we played wizards in a far away country called Viet Nam. I played captain, others played sergeant, major, general, and lots more. The people of that country are short and speak a funny language. They are very friendly. Many of them were hurt or killed, too. It makes me very sad when I think of what we did. Sometimes I can't help crying when I remember. That's one reason why I have quit playing. It is a very bad game. I hope you never start playing. Grown-ups who still play make-believe are sick and should see a doctor. Their minds are not well.

Next time I'll tell you what I decided to do instead of playing Wizards of America. Maybe you will want to do it, too. Bye for now!
“Anarchism is not a romantic fable but the hardheaded realization, based on five thousand years of experience, that we cannot entrust the management of our lives to kings, priests, politicians, generals, and county commissioners.” ―Edward Abbey
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Re: Letters to Jessica

Postby PHOSPHENE » Sat Feb 26, 2011 5:54 pm

Letter Three

February 3rd, 1987

Dear Jessica,

In my last letter I promised to tell you what I have decided to do instead of playing Wizards of America. First, I decided to stop believing in all the wizards of America. I don't believe in the United States of America, that's the biggest Wizard of all in our country. I don't believe in the State of Alaska or any of the other Great Wizards of America. These wizards are always invisible because they are make-believe. Don't forget, no one can force you to play a game you know is bad or to believe in wizards.

When Simon Says is over, no one pretends to believe in Simon any more. I don't believe in Simon or wizards either, like congressmen, presidents, judges, policemen and all the rest. You can see these smaller wizards, but outside the game they are only common men and humbugs, like the Wizard of Oz. They hide behind screens, too, and speak in solemn voices to trick as many as they can.

Part of the screen is in the funny clothes they wear. Policemen dress up like Smokey the Bear. Judges wear long black robes that look like dresses. They sit up high behind big wooden desks. But most of the screen is put in your mind by your teacher and other grown-ups. If you don't let them put the screen in your mind you'll always be able to see that wizards are really humbugs.

It took me a long time to remove the screens from my mind. My teachers worked very hard putting them in there. But now I've knocked them all over just like Dorothy's little dog Toto did in the Wizard of Oz. It is good to see that all the wizards are really just humbugs.

Now all the Great Wizards of all the countries are gone for me. Now when I look at America all I see is green and beautiful country filled with jewels and precious metals and all the good things to make people happy. And I see many good people and many humbugs, but no wizards at all.

I should tell you about another trick that grown-ups play on children to make them want to play Wizards of America. Children are told that if they don't play make believe when they grow up then there will be chaos and anarchy. They say many will be hurt or killed. Children are told that to scare them. When they grow up they believe it is true without really thinking about it. But it is a lie. It is such a silly lie we should laugh about it! But it is a very sad lie, too, because really it is playing wizards that hurts people. In another letter I'll tell you the story of the time everyone stopped playing wizards for several years right here in America and how everything was just fine.

So I have quit playing United States of America. I'm not afraid to stop pretending there are wizards who can protect us. Now I have stopped believing that Great Wizards rule the countries of the world. Now I believe in the Kingdom of God.

It really is true that God rules the world. The men who wrote the Bible thought so, too. If you ask grown-ups who have read the Bible, Is God the ruler of the whole world, many of them will say, Yes, He is. They will tell you God rules the world and we must do as He says. But then they will lie to you. They will tell you God wants us to play Wizards of America. They pretend God wants us to be ruled by humbugs. That is not true. God wants to rule us Himself directly without any wizards at all.

Ask your Dad to read you the story of when the old country of Israel wanted to be ruled by a wizard and a humbug. God had ruled them for hundreds of years, but they thought it would be more fun to play make-believe. God said He would pick a humbug to rule them. God said it would be a bad thing and it was. Israel's humbug wizard was called a king. His name was Saul. Today's children paly Simon Says, but the Israelites played Saul Says. You can find that story in First Samuel, Chapter 8.

On the spectrum of government find where the Israelites started, then where they ended up with Saul. This is something new for you. Ask your Mom and Dad to help you. We'll be doing this for other people, too!
Man's Rule
(Saul's Law) God's Rule
(God's Law)
If we want God to rule us we must do what He says. Even first graders can understand and obey His rules. There are only two main ones. First, we must Love God our King with our whole being. All the effort that goes into pretending that wizards are real must be used to believe God is real.

Grown-ups pretend wizards rule them. Like the State of Alaska and the United States. They believe in them even though they know other men made them up. If grown-ups can believe such a lie, then they can believe the truth that God rules them. The reason that it is hard for grown-ups to believe that God rules the world is simple. If God rules the world then grown-ups can't play wizards. Grown-ups love to play wizards more than they love God, of they are afraid and it's easier to go along than speak up.

So the first rule is to love God more than anything else. The second rule is like the first one. Love other people as much as we love ourselves. This is what people call The Golden Rule. It means you should always do to other people what you would like them to do to you. It takes lots of practice to do this every time. It works like this. If you want your sister to share her toys with you, you must share your toys with her. In the Bible this second rule is, also, An eye for and eye and a tooth for a tooth. No one wants a tooth knocked out! So be very careful not to knock out someone else's tooth. Be very careful not to hurt anyone. Be as nice as you can to everyone, even if they aren't nice to you.

As long as you live at home you must obey your parents. As you grow older you will notice inside you a strong desire to find something to take the place of your Mom and Dad. The best thing to take that place is God. But grown-ups want to trick you into using that desire to let the wizards they made up to rule you. Humbugs want to take the place of God in your heart and mind. They think that because God is invisible and wizards are invisible that you will never know the difference. They are wrong. I know the difference and now you do too!

I know the second rule is in your hear and mind because one day when I was staying with you I overheard you and Halley talking. The two of you were playing and you hurt Halley's arm. Halley made a scrunched-up face and held her arm. Then she said, How would you like me to do that to you? The Golden Rule is the same: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. Little children know it without being told because it is put in their hearts and minds by God.

These two rules of God are called Commandments or laws of God. Your Dad can read them to you from Matthew 22:37-40. There are ten commandments you should know about. Maybe your Dad will teach them to you. I think grown-ups and children should all stop believing that wizards rule them and let God rule them. In my next letter I'll tell you a true story about a little girl who knew what I'm telling you over a hundred years ago. 'Bye for now!
“Anarchism is not a romantic fable but the hardheaded realization, based on five thousand years of experience, that we cannot entrust the management of our lives to kings, priests, politicians, generals, and county commissioners.” ―Edward Abbey
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Re: Letters to Jessica

Postby lostandfound » Sun Feb 27, 2011 4:56 am

One of my favorite books of all. I learned so much from this one long ago. Thanks to you Phosphene.(good link! includes the lessons!) I bought this book for my nephew 10+ years ago, I wish i would have read it when i was 16.(it wasn't written yet.)

I figured you would find this forum sooner or later. I do not see you posting much on the other ones.You probably do,but under a different stagename. :) . We should anticipate tptb and have an alternative/back-up forum. (like that other forum. ;) )

caio.
"None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who falsely believe they are free. The truth has been kept from the depth of their minds by masters who rule them with lies. They feed them on falsehoods till wrongs look like right in their eyes." ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
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Re: Letters to Jessica

Postby grndslm » Sun Feb 27, 2011 10:09 am

lostandfound wrote:I figured you would find this forum sooner or later. I do not see you posting much on the other ones.You probably do,but under a different stagename. :) . We should anticipate tptb and have an alternative/back-up forum. (like that other forum. ;) )
Good idea!! Here we go...

http://freeman.freeforums.org

The "Freeman" name wasn't available a few weeks ago when SJC was getting attacked. It just opened up in the past couple days, so I've reserved it as a backup or to point other would-be freemen to the right spot. ;)
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"When Tyranny becomes Law, Rebellion becomes Duty." -- Someone from the Confederacy, circa 1860
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Re: Letters to Jessica

Postby lostandfound » Mon Mar 07, 2011 4:44 pm

Great job,in thinking ahead. i already registered ovr thar.
"None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who falsely believe they are free. The truth has been kept from the depth of their minds by masters who rule them with lies. They feed them on falsehoods till wrongs look like right in their eyes." ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
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Re: Letters to Jessica

Postby lostandfound » Tue Nov 22, 2011 9:01 pm

Letter Four
February 4th, 1987

Dear Jessica,

Now I want to tell you the story of a little girl named Laura. She grew up in America about a hundred years ago when many grown-ups believed that God ruled as king for real and not humbugs. You can read the story yourself in the book, Little Town on The Prairie, by Laura Ingalls Wilder.

Laura was born in a log cabin in the year 1867. The story takes place in the summer of 1881 when she was fourteen. It is the Fourth of July. That is the day Americans celebrate the beginning of wizards called United States of America. Back then it wasn't nearly so powerful a wizard in grown-up's minds as it is now because they knew their grandparents had made it up out of thin air.

In Laura's true story a man had just read the Declaration of Independence to the crowd. The Declaration is the letter that Americans sent to King George in 1776 telling him he was a humbug. They told him they didn't believe in wizards called kings anymore. They said God does not want us to be ruled by humbugs no matter what they are called, king, ceasar, parliament, judge, or whatever. They said the Law of Nature, and of Nature's God made them free no matter what people in England may think.

Right after that the crowd sang a song called, America. This song was written to honor God as our for real king by Samuel Smith in 1832. This is the hymn or anthem of our country. The last verse goes like this...


Our fathers' God, to Thee,

Author of Liberty,

To Thee we sing.

Long may our land be bright

With freedom's holy light;

Protect us by thy might,

Great God, our King!
Today, even Christians are unaware of it, but once it was commonly believed that God Himself was America's ruler, not men. Here is what Laura thought to herself those many years ago...

The crowd was scattering away then, but Laura stood stock still. Suddenly she had a completely new thought. The Declaration and the song came together in her mind, and she thought: God is America's king. She thought: Americans won't obey any king on earth. Americans are free. That means they have to obey their own conscience. No king bosses Pa; he has to boss himself. Why (she thought), when I am a little older, Pa and Ma will stop telling me what to do,and there isn't anyone else who has a right to give me orders. I will have to make myself be good.
Her whole mind seemed to be lighted up by that thought. This is what it means to be free. It means,you have to be good. 'Our father's God, author of liberty-'The laws of Nature and of Nature's God endow you with a right to life and liberty. Then you have to keep the laws of God, for God's law is the only thing that gives you a right to be free.'

This is a true story with a very important lesson. You see, today grown-ups don't believe as Laura did a hundred years ago. They have stopped believing that God is America's ruler. They have stopped believing that we should keep God'd laws. That is why we do not have liberty and justice for all. That is why the Pledge of Allegiance is a trick and a lie. Grown-ups have been tricked into obeying the laws of humbugs rather that the laws of God. When Americans stopped believing that God rules them and the world, Americans stopped being free. That means they are slaves to the humbugs and ruled by wizards.

I think Laura was a very smart girl. I think it is time grown ups and children in America stopped playing make-believe games about wizards and started to obey God's law again.

Many grown-ups think they can obey God's law and still play Wizards of America. The truth is that God's first law tells them they can not do both. But they would rather believe a lie. They may ask you to believe the same lie. But remember what Laura said and don't believe them. You are free to choose a man to rule you. You are also free to choose God to rule you. But don't forget, when you choose one you have rejected the other.

Can you find where Laura and her Pa were on the spectrum of govenment? How about Samuel Smith?

Man's Rule .................................................God's Rule
(Humbugs) ...................................................(God)


I hope you are enjoying these letters. It is good that your read then now even though you may not understand them for several years yet. In the next letter I will tell you a story about the men who wrote the Declaration of Independence and called King George a humbug.
"None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who falsely believe they are free. The truth has been kept from the depth of their minds by masters who rule them with lies. They feed them on falsehoods till wrongs look like right in their eyes." ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
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Re: Letters to Jessica

Postby lostandfound » Sat Jul 27, 2013 5:20 pm

Letter Five
February 5th, 1987

Dear Jessica,

When I was going to school my teachers taught me how the United States of America came about. They taught me that without this wizard we would have very bad trouble, many people would be hurt or killed. Your teachers will be telling you the same thing in coming years. But it is not true. Don't believe it.

The truth is that about the time they told King George he was a humbug, grown-ups stopped believing in all the other wizards, too. Now, these men had been told that terrible things would happen if they did that, and they believed the lie just like grown-ups do today. They were afraid to let go of their humbugs. Then they were very surprised and happy when everything was just fine! There were no congressmen, no governors, no policemen, and no judges. Nobody ever teaches this history to children. If people knew they could get along without wizards a lot of humbugs would be out of a job.

So that no one would ever forget the truth about what happens when all man-made government is gone, these men wrote a letter called A Proclamation of the Colony of the Massachusetts's Bay. I put that in Lesson 1 so you can read it and know it really did happen.

Government is the word grown-ups use when they mean all the wizards they believe in both great and small, visible and invisible. Thomas Paine was alive then and he wrote about the abolishment of government, too. He was not afraid to live without government. He knew that government and all its wizards are humbugs. I put Thomas Paine's ideas in Lesson 1, also.

David Ramsey was alive then, too. He saw that people get along just fine without human government. He told us in his book that there is a real government which can be seen only when make-believe governments are gone. That is the government that each of us has in his heart and mind. The same government that Laura Wilder knew about. It is called the Kingdom of God in the Bible. Wizards do not like the Kingdom of God because it helps people stop believing in humbug rulers. It helps people stop playing Wizards of America.

In Russia the wizards are very mean to people who stop playing make-believe and live in the real world of God's kingdom. In Lesson Thirteen I'll tell you about some people in Russia called Doukhabors and what happened to them when they told the Czar he was a humbug. The same thing happens in Russia today, and very sadly, in America as well. A famous writer named Count Leo Tolstoy helped the Doukhabors leave Russia. It's a very interesting story.

Many of us have been put in jail many times for trying to live in the Kingdom of God and for telling the truth about wizards. But the last time they did not put me in jail. That story is in Lesson 11.

Say hello to your Dad and Mom, and Grandma Mary and Grandpa George. Bye for now!
"None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who falsely believe they are free. The truth has been kept from the depth of their minds by masters who rule them with lies. They feed them on falsehoods till wrongs look like right in their eyes." ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
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Re: Letters to Jessica

Postby lostandfound » Thu Apr 24, 2014 8:16 pm

Tolstoy’s Remarkable Manifesto on Christian Anarchy and Pacifism

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Kingdo ... Within_You
http://blog.independent.org/2014/04/21/ ... -pacifism/

I’ve just finished reading Leo Tolstoy’s remarkable book The Kingdom of God Is Within You. This was written in Russian and completed in 1893, but the Russian censors forbade its publication. It circulated in unpublished form in Russia, however, and was soon translated into other languages and published abroad. It had substantial influence on the course of history, perhaps most of all because of its influence on Gandhi.

The book is odd in several respects. In a purely literary sense, it is by no means a masterpiece, as Tolstoy’s great novels, written earlier in his life, were. In places it reads more like a set of notes for a book than as a polished work. For example, it contains many very long block quotations and much unnecessary repetition. However, Tolstoy’s mastery as a writer still shines in the brilliance of some of his formulations, especially in the second half of the book.

Odd, too, is Tolstoy’s own curiously uneven command of different aspects of his subject. In regard to the nature and operation of the state and the sociology of human interrelations in the socio-political order, Tolstoy’s clear-eyed insights cut to the quick. He makes even an analyst such as James Buchanan, who complained about people’s “romantic” views of politics and the state, seem utterly romantic. In contrast, Tolstoy’s understanding of economics was abysmal and leads him into foolish notions of the equivalence between state acts and capitalist acts. He seems also to have given no thought to what the consequences would be if his communistic preferences about the distribution of property were adopted in practice. Although he had excellent insights into the role of (what I call) ideology in the maintenance of the state-dominated social order, he entertained a view of how the dominant ideology was changing and would continue to change that seems to me completely lacking in contemporary evidence and utterly at variance with everything we now know about how ideology did change during the past century or so. He greatly overestimated the hold that Christian morality had on the souls of people in the West at the time he was writing, not to speak of later, even less Christian times.

Tolstoy is one of the most important Christian anarchists in history, yet his views on Christianity were anything but typical. For example, he regarded the various Christian churches as totally corrupt and as the propagators of false and spurious doctrines that only helped the dominant elites to retain their hold on political, social, and economic power while oppressing the great mass of the people. Self-serving members of the upper crust were, in his eyes, willing to avert their eyes from the truth, especially the Truth of Christianity as expressed above all by the Sermon on the Mount. This sermon, indeed, seems to have amounted to not only the heart of Tolstoy’s Christianity, but to the bulk of it, as well. For him, Christianity was above all a commitment to love others as one’s self and to abstain from the use of force and violence, even in resistance to evil or in self-defense. Thus, as a Christian anarchist, he comes close to occupying a class of his own (though not quite all his own).

I plan to write at greater length about Tolstoy’s fascinating book for a future “Etceteras” feature in The Independent Review. Aside from its interest as a manifesto for Christian pacifism and anarchism, the book contains many anticipations of ideas later developed in economics and public choice, and it deserves much greater attention in these regards than it has previously received.
"None are more hopelessly enslaved than those who falsely believe they are free. The truth has been kept from the depth of their minds by masters who rule them with lies. They feed them on falsehoods till wrongs look like right in their eyes." ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
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